In response to the Coronavirus we have increased our telephone & video call appointments, now available 7 days a week from 7am to 10pm

COVID 19 Update. 7th of April 2020: Our offices remain open for business. New clients can choose to whether
they prefer a face to face or a video appointment. We have had no known cases in the office. Call for more details. Click here

Head Office:
5th Floor Maddox House, 1 Maddox Street, Mayfair, London, W1S 2PZ

EEA

European and family members of EEA nationals have additional right to reside and work in the United Kingdom. These rights are separate to the rights held by other foreign nationals.

Westkin’s specialist lawyers are aware of these rights and have been assisting clients and winning cases under European Law for a number of years. We pride ourselves on being aware of avenues and solutions that no other firm are aware of.

Find out exactly how we can help you; contact us, directly on 0207 118 4546 (or simply use the enquiry form at the top).

Our lawyers undertake the following areas of EEA law:

  • Applications for foreign nationals who are married to EEA nationals who want to reside in the UK (further information is on this page)
  • Applications for those foreign nationals who are unmarried partners to EEA nationals. (for further information, click here)
  •  Applications for foreign nationals who wish to remain in the UK after divorcing an EEA national (for further information, click here)
  •  Applications for permanent residence under EEA law (for further information, click here)
  •  Applications for high net worth individuals to purchase EEA passports, usually around 500,000 pounds (for further information, click here).

EEA Nationals Married to Foreign Nationals

Foreign nationals who marry EEA nationals have the right to reside in the United Kingdom. This right operates differently for those foreign nationals who marry UK Citizens.

Key requirements:

(a)    The EEA national and the foreign national need to be married.

It is not enough to be engaged (unlike the UK fiancée visa), a marriage needs to take place. A gay or straight couple who marry are fine, so long as they have a civil partnership, marriage certificate or civil union certificate from the UK, any EEA country, or any third country.

It matters not how long they have been married, but the length of relationship may be relevant.

(b)   The EEA national and foreign national are required to be in a genuine relationship.

The relevant rules only require that the marriage is not one of convenience, but in reality the evidence produced to show that the couple are in ongoing relationship is one and the same. This evidence is normally highly individual and will need to go to both the relationship and often also joint residency where relevant.

(c)   The EEA national must be economically active

The relevant rules require that the EEA national exercise treaty rights, this essentially means economic activity in the following:

  • Being employed
  • Being self-employed
  • Being economically self-sufficient, actively looking for work
  • Being a student with private medical health cover

The application can take up to 6 months, but we have had success getting applications back before this. We also can apply without the EEA national’s passport and can also apply inside the UK, even if the foreign national is a visitor, holds another visa or is an over-stayer.

Find out exactly how all of the above applies to you; contact us, directly on: 0207 118 4546 (or simply use the enquiry form at the top).

Westkin Associates
0207 118 4546
info@westkin.com
17 Hanover Square

Mayfair
London
W1S 1HT
United Kingdom

© 2019 Westkin – London Immigration Lawyers

oiscWestkin Associates is authorized by the OISC
Registration No. F200800119

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