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5th Floor Maddox House, 1 Maddox Street, Mayfair, London, W1S 2PZ

EEA Divorce – Retained Rights

Westkin Associates supports you in difficult times

Divorce and separation are always difficult and are emotionally draining and challenging. Such situations are often more complex especially when  children are involved and the last thing you want to worry about is your personal immigration status. Westkin Associates can offer you peace of mind and assistance in such difficult times through step by step project management of your immigration case. Our expert team of  immigration experts can assist with providing relevant options and solutions to your immigration needs. We tailor our solutions based on each and every clients needs and work with you and for you to build the strongest application possible. 

Our experts will advise you on what impact the divorce will have on you from an immigration points of view and build solutions to put together your case to stay in the U.K. To see how Westkin Associaties can solve your immigration difficulties we can be reached via  or on 0207 1184 546 In challenging times Westkin Associates supports you. 

As specialist immigration lawyers, we can assist in cases where a European national marries a non-European national; however where a relationship has broken down, we can also assist with the immigration process after a divorce.

The European rules have set out how it is possible for non-European nationals to remain in the UK and eventually qualify for permanent residence, even when a relationship has broken down. Other than the relationship breaking down, the non-European national may also keep their right to remain in the UK if their EEA partner passes away.

These circumstances are set out in regulation 10 of the 2006 Regulations.

How do I stay in the UK if I am migrant whose marriage to a UK national has broken down?

In the following circumstances, non-EU nationals can apply if the following would apply to them:

1. The marriage or civil partnership last for a minimum 3 years; and

2. During those 3 years, the couple lived together for at least 1 of those years; and

3. The EEA national should be exercising their EU treaty rights at the time of application.

4. The couple will need to have been divorced at the time of application.

We understand how stressful divorce can be and we ensure that we support every step of the process to make your application as smooth as possible. We work closely with the home office in order to offer you a wide range of options that will allow you to work towards your desired outcome.  Indeed, our specialist team that deals with EEA divorce and retained rights works exclusively on these types of cases meaning that they can help you with your application and paperwork getting you the results that you are looking for.

For further information on how you may be able to stay in the UK after your relationship has broken down, please do not hesitate to contact our immigration specialists for a more detailed discussion via  or 0207 1184 546

© 2019 Westkin – London Immigration Lawyers

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